My Grand Balkan Tour (Pictures Included) (Read Before Going There!)

This was one of the best meals I had in the Balkans, at Kravice waterfalls, and so I figured I’d make it the featured image. Vegetarians beware, food choices are limited for you in this part of the world.

Being limited to the Schengen visa-zone means an American like me has to depart for a “less traditional” European country after three months are up. Generally, this means the Balkans or East Europe. A blessing in disguise. After I left Prague this year, I was forced to have a three month interlude into the former Yugoslavia.

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How to Travel on a MICRO BUDGET and still THRIVE

how to travel

So lately people have been asking me, “How are you able to travel the world? You must have inherited a bunch of money” which I translate as “You’re just some privileged dude doing what other people can’t.”

This is, of course, laughable. I currently travel to countless interesting places at $800 a month. This means that when I make more than this per month, I am traveling and saving money. Who would have thought?

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My Prague Spring Ended Too Soon (A Photo Tour) (Days 60-150)

Under the steps of Prague Castle.

I’d heard great things about the Prague spring time. After I left Croatia in March, I migrated to the Czech Republic, formerly known as the Kingdom of Bohemia, and once also the jewel of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

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10 Reasons to Leave America

leave america

As a preface, understand that America has some of the best scenery and nicest smaller towns in the world. It also provides maybe the most amount of geographic options within a single country. Finally, it’s the greatest place I can think of to do business. All that being said, as a world traveler I find there are many reasons to leave America and become an expat due to cultural issues. I will list them here.

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Where to Go in Croatia When You’re a Nomad (Days 31-60)

Where to go in Croatia

I heard a fair share of uncertainty before I left to Croatia for my next month-long destination, namely that there is no where to go in Croatia in winter; as the whole country will be frozen over like a year-old popsicle. So, was this true?

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Things to do in Istanbul When You’re a Nomad (Days 13-30)

things to do in istanbul

You last heard from me in Switzerland, at the Lifestyle Design conference. On a whim, I had decided to make my next stop Istanbul, the largest city in the region (and in Turkey). There are plenty of things to do in Istanbul for eccentric, nomadic backpackers like myself.

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Zurich and the Lifestyle Design Convention (Days 9-11)

lifestyle design

Timothy Marc presents at the Lifestyle Design Convention

After leaving London, I caught a flight out of the distant Luton airport to get to Zurich. From the window of my plane, I saw a cascade of snow-covered mountains open the gates into Switzerland. Landing in Zurich, I realized the city was filled with old-world architecture and a lot of fancy clock-towers. As I always do in a new city in a new country, I proceeded to get hopelessly lost.

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Travelogue Days 7-8: The Real British Experience, and Marmite


Part of the idea of being a digital nomad is to “not be a tourist”. As such, it’s often best to find the most authentic experiences that you can. This is rarely accomplished by hanging out in a hotel, nor even a hostel (which tends to be a more international versus local experience).

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Travelogue Day 6 – Kensington Palace, London

kensington palace

On this day, I was fortunate enough to meet up with my friend Sarah Feeney from Notting Hill (a friend from Arizona). I hiked from my little room at the Greyhound pub (The Monkeys in the Trees Hostel) to her home a couple of miles away. From there, we were looking for something in the immediate area to do. Across the street is Kensington Palace.

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Travelogue Day 5 – In Search of the Most Traditional British Food (The Ginger Pig)


I often hear people cracking jokes about traditional British food. Namely, that it’s not very good. “Everything’s boiled,” I hear them say. “I hope you like boiled, salted porks and overcooked cabbage and flavorless shepherd’s pies”.

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Travelogue Days 2-4: Grand London Walking Tour

london walking tourWhat’s it like to walk from the edge of Shepherd’s Bush on London’s far West end, all the way to Waterloo St around Southwark? The answer is very hard on the old feet. This personally invented London walking tour concluded with going back up the edge of the Thames, across Westminster bridge and finally to a SoHo underground station, reaching a total of around 9 miles of walking.

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Travelogue Day 1 – London New Years

london new yearsThe first day of international travel is almost always a rough patch for me. Without fail, I get sick. This time was no exception, as I finally caught the cold going around (the one that lasts days and makes you feel super sluggish). Couple this with very little sleep, the sudden timezone change, and a LOT of walking after I finally landed in the middle of the London new years, and I was the walking dead.

Taking the train to west London, I immediately realized it was bitter cold. My leather jacket wasn’t enough, and I had to fish for my gloves and scarf. Without a proper internet connection, I began searching for a Starbucks to get on Google Maps and get my bearings (next time, I should prepare more thoroughly). Slowly, I mapped out a walking route to the hostel. The 1.4 mile distance felt monumental given my sickness and tiredness. However, I was not ready to pay a fortune for a London taxi.

I arrived at the Monkey in the Trees Hostel, which is in an area near the borough of Hammersmith, near a very old market (Shepherd’s Bush Market). The hostel is actually part of a pub called The Greyhound. The pub is on the bottom floor, and upstairs are the bunk beds.

Unlike “pubs” in the West, many pubs in England seem more like family locations, and during the early evening the pub / hostel is swamped by families with their kids running around, while mom and dad drink pints.

I met with two wonderful Chilean women, Esi and Ninia. We immediately clicked and spent the evening together, making it to Leicester Square, which is the closest available place to watch New Years fireworks without having to pay a monumental ticket price. We arrived via the “tube” railway. A costly but effective mass transit system ($6.00 or so per one-way ticket).

Esi and Nenia met up with almost a dozen other Chileans who they had encountered the night before quite randomly. This left me feeling slightly awkward, as I don’t speak Spanish. And, by around 1 AM I wanted nothing more than to pass out.

We ended up in a Mexican restaurant. I was not that interested given that I was born and raised in the American Southwest, and it was about US $8.00 just to enter the place.

I needed a strategy to wake myself up, so I took a small shot of hot sauce. The others thought I was crazy, but it cut back my cold symptoms and gave me a second wind of energy.

Now with more energy, I managed to get a lot of exciting shots of different streets in the early hours, including Chinatown and it’s huge hanging orange lamp / orb.

Ended up having a lot of fun. I have yet to meet a single Londoner who does NOT have a sense of humor. This makes meeting random strangers both very fun and easy.

Returned at 5 AM. Despite everything I’d been through, I could only sleep 3 hours (maybe because of my cold). I woke up and had the complimentary breakfast, and then got to work on my computer. Around noon, the real tiredness set in. I returned to my room and passed out for five hours.

We’ll see what tomorrow brings

london new years